Confusion About Whether The CDC Actually Recommends Pregnant Women Get The COVID-19 Vaccine

Confusion About Whether The CDC Actually Recommends Pregnant Women Get The COVID-19 Vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now say that pregnant women should simply consider the risks and benefits of COVID-19 vaccination – walking back its own director’s recommendation that expectant mothers get the shot.  “CDC recommends that pregnant people receive the COVID-19 vaccine,” director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said in a Friday White House press briefing.  She cited a CDC analysis of data on more than 35,000 women who have been vaccinated with either Pfizer’s or Moderna’s shots that found no increase in risks of complications, premature delivery, miscarriage or other issues among women who got the vaccines.

But the guidance for pregnant women posted to the CDC’s website never changed. It still says that “any of the currently authorized COVID-19 vaccines can be offered to people who are pregnant or breastfeeding.  If facing decisions about whether to receive a COVID-19 vaccine while pregnant, people should consider risk of exposure to COVID-19, the increased risk of severe infection while pregnant, the known benefits of vaccination, and the limited but growing evidence about the safety of COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy,” a CDC spokesperson told CBS News.  It falls considerably short of Walensky’s blunt Friday endorsement of COVID-19 vaccination for pregnant women.

To view the CDC page on pregnancy and vaccines, CLICK HERE (You will be redirected)

Photo Credit: Government of Ontario

 

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